Dog Profiles: Pit Bull


  • While the UK and certainly Churchill was associated with the English Bulldog, the Americans in WWI and WWII used the Pit Bull as their mascot.
  • The Pit Bull is the result of crossbreeding an English Bulldog with a terrier — making the Pit Bull’s frame sinewy but spry.
  • Often used in heartless and bloody spectacles during the early part of the 20th century,  the Pit Bull was set against bears tied to posts or thrown into pits filled with rats (hence the name “Pit Bull.”) Such practices are part of the storied, infamous past of the Pit Bull, but thankfully, the modern day Pit Bull is fed with more lovingkindness than abject brutality.
  • A Pit Bull has appeared on the cover of Life magazine three times — more than any other breed.
  • Pit Bulls have been banned from England and Wales since 1991.
  • No other breed has been the subject of such politicized fervor. There are BSL’s (Breed specific legislation) that affect only Pit Bulls and offshoots of the breed, and several cities in America or parts of major cities ban Pit Bull ownership.
  • When dogfighting resurfaced in America, the stigma of the Pit Bull as a terror-machine began to grow. Statistically, the Pit Bull is the most neglected breed of dog in the States. There are many terrible Pit Bull owners who tie their dog to a chain and don’t properly care for their dog; The want a dog that appears “tough” in their yards, and do nothing to elevate the reputation of a Pit Bull as a friendly companion.
  • Helen Keller had a companion Pit Bull named Stubby.
  • Petie was the name of the Pit Bull that starred in the classic TV series The Little Rascals. 
  • Despite their reputation, a Pit Bull can be as docile as you or me.